Molly Popular As Latest Drug For Underground Rave Scene


If you hear your kids talking about Molly, chances are it's not a new girl in school. Molly is the name for a drug that's been making waves in the underground rave scene for years. Recently it followed electronic dance music into the mainstream, and now high school and college kids are carried away by the drug, touted as pure MDMA.

The Truth About Molly
Molly--short for "molecule"--is a synthetic form of MDMA, the chemical component of ecstasy. MDMA is a psychedelic and a stimulant, causing distortions of time and senses and energy surges. Molly does produce a similar high, but it is cheaper and is becoming more and more widespread.
Other side effects of Molly are not so pleasant. They can include increased blood pressure and heart rate, severe dehydration, hyperthermia (a condition in which the body temperature gets dangerously high, causing severe damage to internal organs), and intense teeth clenching. Not only that, mental effects are strong--Molly can produce psychosis, aggressiveness, severe agitation, and severe depression as the user comes down off of it.
Molly is often laced with other substances like caffeine. This increases its potential for overdose. Signs of overdose include:
• Agitation and aggression, reported in a number of overdose cases. This may include physical characteristics like stirring or shaking, or they may be as simple as restlessness or excitement.
• Dilated pupils, remaining large even in bright lights.
• Seizures are extremely common in overdoses of MDMA. These can occur rapidly and are usually manifested by changes in consciousness, emotion, vision, skin sensation, muscle tension and twitching.
What Molly Does to the Brain
Molly is smoked, eaten or parachuted (folded in a tissue and swallowed), and about twenty minutes later the euphoria begins. A rush of neurotransmitters including serotonin and dopamine causes the user to feel elated, empathetic and energized. The senses are sharpened, which is why it is so commonly used at concerts, to enhance auditory experience.
A few hours later, the high is over. The brain, however, does not forget. Slightly reliant on molly for some of its functions, it no longer produces the same amount of neurotransmitters. This is the time when users are often flooded with depression. Long-term users experience forgetfulness and other mental effects, which can cause decreased academic performance.
Users often turn to other illicit drugs like cocaine and heroin to get a similar high to that they experience on Molly. In this way, Molly is a gateway drug.
Users of Molly tend to be between the ages of sixteen and twenty-four. While a vast number of them are involved in the club scene, not every case is tied together. It is not difficult to get one's hands on the drug. Addicts need only send a text or a message via Facebook or share with a friend or classmate. It is priced at about $20 per pill or $100 per gram.
Because of this Molly has attracted many new young users. But, with more information known about this drug, usage can be decreased or stopped all together.
This can come from a variety of things such as more drug prevention and education, rehab services for those addicted and stricter enforcement on the products sold that can make this drug.
The main point is the consumers have to put a stop to Molly and other synthetic drug use. Talk to you kids, make sure schools are doing the same. Know the signs of abuse and get your loved one help if they need it.
For more information contact Narconon Vista Bay.
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About Olumide Owaduge

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